Mattingly Charities

Major League Baseball’s All-Star Week

 

Players for Mattingly Charities RBI are home after a trip of a lifetime in Miami for the Major League Baseball’s All-Star week. The youth players spent time with Evansville native Don Mattingly, Jamie Foxx, and Bryce Harper. 44News sports reporter Nick Ruffolo explains how Mattingly RBI learned from MLB’s role models to become role models themselves.

View the Video Here

Miami Set to Host All-Star Youth Classic

Twelve youth baseball and softball teams representing various organizations, including one founded by Marlins manager Don Mattingly, will participate in the ninth annual All-Star Youth Classic during next month’s MLB All-Star Week in Miami.

The friendly round-robin tournament will feature more than 140 baseball and softball players, ages 11-12, participating in games on July 7-10 at Grapeland Park and Fern Isle Park in Miami. They will also attend the 88th Major League All-Star Game presented by MasterCard on July 11 at Marlins Park as well as several other All-Star Week events.

“We are looking forward to hosting these young men and women in Miami for the All-Star Youth Classic and All-Star Week festivities,” said Tony Reagins, MLB’s senior vice president of youth programs. “Providing opportunities for them to highlight their skills on the field is important, but we believe it is just as meaningful to give them a chance to build lifelong friendships and memories through this once-in-a-lifetime experience.”

The 12 teams scheduled to participate in the All-Star Youth Classic include several special groups from across the U.S. and Puerto Rico. For the second consecutive year, an all-girls baseball team — this time the Stamford (Conn.) Sluggers — will compete against the boys.

Other notable teams include Mattingly Charities RBI of Evansville, Ind. Mattingly, who led Evansville Memorial High to a perfect 30-0 record and the Indiana state championship in 1978, founded this youth team as a member of MLB’s Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) program. There also will be one baseball and one softball team from the All-Star host Marlins RBI program.

Jackson Park RBI will represent the new RBI program in Flint, Mich., and Puerto Rico RBI will make a showing for the Caribbean. Here are the cities (and national youth leagues) that will be represented at the All-Star Youth Classic:

• Lajas, Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico RBI) — softball
• Columbia (S.C.) RBI — baseball
• El Paso, Texas (Base Play RBI) — softball
• Evansville, Ind. (Mattingly Charities RBI) — baseball
• Flint, Mich. (Jackson Park RBI) — baseball
• Hawthorne, Calif. (Holly Park Little League) — baseball
• Jersey City, N.J. (Roberto Clemente RBI) — softball
• Miami RBI (two teams) — baseball and softball
• Oxford (Ala.) Dixie Youth Baseball — baseball
• Stamford (Conn.) Sluggers — girls baseball
• Tampa (Wellswood Sports Association PONY) — baseball

This annual event used to be known as the Jr. RBI Classic, but last year MLB invited other organizations and renamed it the All-Star Youth Classic.

Participants of the All-Star Youth Classic will have the opportunity to attend other All-Star Week events, including MLB All-Star FanFest at the Miami Beach Convention Center; All-Star Sunday, including the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game and All-Star Legends & Celebrity Softball Game; Gatorade All-Star Workout Day featuring the T-Mobile Home Run Derby at Marlins Park; and various Play Ball-related events. Additionally, participants will be exposed to a variety of off-field life experiences, including rooming on campus at the University of Miami and a community service activity.

The 88th Midsummer Classic, at Marlins Park in Miami, will be televised nationally by FOX Sports; in Canada by Rogers Sportsnet and RDS; and worldwide by partners in more than 160 countries. ESPN Radio and ESPN Radio Deportes will provide exclusive national radio coverage, while MLB Network, MLB.com and SiriusXM will have comprehensive All-Star Week coverage. For more information about MLB All-Star Week and to purchase tickets, please visit AllStarGame.com and follow @AllStarGame on social media.

Mark Newman is enterprise editor of MLB.com and a baseball writer since 1990. Follow him @Marathoner and read and join other baseball fans on his MLB.com/blogs hub. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Mattingly, HBC Challenger Baseball Celebrate First-Ever Night Game

The HBC Challenger League based in Evansville has been going strong thanks to the community and large donations from organizations like Mattingly Charities.

However, having a night game on the north side was something new for the team and a big turnout from families and fans alike made for a special evening.

Mattingly, Torre Give Back at Local Charity Event

Don Mattingly wanted to wear his lapel pin commemorating the late Jose Fernandez again Wednesday.

He hadn’t put on the circular, black pin with Fernandez’s No. 16 since attending his Marlins pitcher’s funeral two months ago. He felt the second “An Intimate Evening With Friends” Mattingly Charities fundraising event seemed like the proper occasion to honor Fernandez.

After all, Fernandez’s always-enthusiastic attitude embodied what Mattingly’s charitable efforts are about — giving back to underprivileged youth through programs that support baseball.

“Jose touched a lot of people’s hearts but he was a little kid at heart,” Mattingly said inside the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science.

Mattingly focused on the kids who will benefit from the money raised whenever he’d get stressed planning the night’s logistics. He wants to make a difference.

In the past year, he and his wife Lori donated $25,000 to Challenger Baseball League and launched the Mattingly Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) program. He said those initiatives are only laying the foundation.

“Lori and I, our hearts are with the youth and the kids who have been underserved and underprivileged and we’re trying to stay in those areas,” he said. “But we want to obviously add on to this past year.”

Hall of Fame manager and four-time World Series champion Joe Torre was their special guest. He joked that he would’ve attended last year’s inaugural event but Mattingly said not to come because he already booked Los Angeles Angels All-Star Albert Pujols, Baltimore Orioles manager Buck Showalter and country music star Toby Keith.

“I’m not here because he supports my foundation, I’m here because it’s an important cause and Donnie is a special individual,” Torre said. “We got close during the Yankee years and he has been so passionate about young people.”

Torre explained that whether MLB players like it or not, they’re role models to children and it’s their responsibility to set a good example, especially for those who are disadvantaged.

“They’re at a point in their lives where they could go astray or they could go in the direction that’s going to be a lot healthier,” Torre said. “We need to make them feel important and that they’re going to be part of the solution.”

Nashville country recording artists and famed songwriters The Warren Brothers played several songs during the sold-out event attended by 200 people. VIP tickets were $300 and general admission tickets were $150, while live and silent auctions also took place. The Warren Brothers opened with a song they wrote for Kieth, “Red Solo Cup.”

“Any chance we can do something to give back is great,” Brett Warren said. “We’re really glad to be here and we’re so thankful for Don calling us up and asking us to come do this.”

A father of four boys, Mattingly knows children need to learn baseball early because it’s tough to develop the skills late. Of course, he first wants to help, but it’s certainly a bonus if his help boosts inner-city kids’ interest in the game.

“One of the things I noticed with my boys playing is there were very few African-American kids playing,” Mattingly said. “It’s just a matter of giving them access to it. If they don’t want to play, that’s fine. But you have to have access.”

An Intimate Evening with Friends

Thank you to EVERYONE who joined us for “An Intimate Evening with Friends.” The night was a huge success for Mattingly RBI and Evansville.

Check out highlights from the event:

Mattingly, Torre Give Back at Local Charity Event

Don Mattingly wanted to wear his lapel pin commemorating the late Jose Fernandez again Wednesday.

He hadn’t put on the circular, black pin with Fernandez’s No. 16 since attending his Marlins pitcher’s funeral two months ago. He felt the second “An Intimate Evening With Friends” Mattingly Charities fundraising event seemed like the proper occasion to honor Fernandez.

After all, Fernandez’s always-enthusiastic attitude embodied what Mattingly’s charitable efforts are about — giving back to underprivileged youth through programs that support baseball.

“Jose touched a lot of people’s hearts but he was a little kid at heart,” Mattingly said inside the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science.

Mattingly focused on the kids who will benefit from the money raised whenever he’d get stressed planning the night’s logistics. He wants to make a difference.

In the past year, he and his wife Lori donated $25,000 to Challenger Baseball League and launched the Mattingly Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) program. He said those initiatives are only laying the foundation.

“Lori and I, our hearts are with the youth and the kids who have been underserved and underprivileged and we’re trying to stay in those areas,” he said. “But we want to obviously add on to this past year.”

Hall of Fame manager and four-time World Series champion Joe Torre was their special guest. He joked that he would’ve attended last year’s inaugural event but Mattingly said not to come because he already booked Los Angeles Angels All-Star Albert Pujols, Baltimore Orioles manager Buck Showalter and country music star Toby Keith.

“I’m not here because he supports my foundation, I’m here because it’s an important cause and Donnie is a special individual,” Torre said. “We got close during the Yankee years and he has been so passionate about young people.”

Torre explained that whether MLB players like it or not, they’re role models to children and it’s their responsibility to set a good example, especially for those who are disadvantaged.

“They’re at a point in their lives where they could go astray or they could go in the direction that’s going to be a lot healthier,” Torre said. “We need to make them feel important and that they’re going to be part of the solution.”

Nashville country recording artists and famed songwriters The Warren Brothers played several songs during the sold-out event attended by 200 people. VIP tickets were $300 and general admission tickets were $150, while live and silent auctions also took place. The Warren Brothers opened with a song they wrote for Kieth, “Red Solo Cup.”

“Any chance we can do something to give back is great,” Brett Warren said. “We’re really glad to be here and we’re so thankful for Don calling us up and asking us to come do this.”

A father of four boys, Mattingly knows children need to learn baseball early because it’s tough to develop the skills late. Of course, he first wants to help, but it’s certainly a bonus if his help boosts inner-city kids’ interest in the game.

“One of the things I noticed with my boys playing is there were very few African-American kids playing,” Mattingly said. “It’s just a matter of giving them access to it. If they don’t want to play, that’s fine. But you have to have access.”